Why the Christian Right is Wrong on Religious Liberty


Religious Liberty

Before anyone strokes out, let’s preface with this: While I struggle with how to classify religious liberty – Is it a social issue? Is it a fundamental issue? A Constitutional one? Simply something we will forever fight as the culture of society changes? – I do support religious liberty.

For the sake of ease of understanding and frame of reference, let’s consider a same-sex couple seeking to have a wedding/civil union/grand party – whatever the state allows – and they are seeking vendors for various services. They live in a moderately-sized city where there are multiple options for attire, cakes, DJ’s and venues.

We have to first consider a premise that most conservatives, but not all Republicans, would agree with: Under no circumstance should any business be forced to do anything. Whether the mandate be for hours of operation, location, employee diversity or minimum wage, the government has no place. Who you serve, how you serve, when you serve is a slippery slope.

But that slope slides both ways (pun not intended). Religious liberty is a teetering topic just perched upon the peak of the mountain waiting for anyone to slip on a banana peel forcing an avalanche down either side. When a business starts refusing business to a certain type of people, folks immediately and unfortunately jump back to the pre-Civil Rights Movement days where we saw hatred oozing from segregated areas. On the other side, we have folks operating under a system of government that neither respects private enterprise or religion. At that point, what good are we?

But it isn’t the same. While religious freedom is our first and fundamental God-given right so sacred that it is enumerated in the Constitution, religious liberty goes a tad further. Religious liberty expands to freedom of belief through practice, not just observance. It goes beyond Christianity, and much to the chagrin of the Left, it also protects the atheists and the agnostic.

So back to our same-sex couple looking for vendors. The argument that a person shouldn’t want someone who doesn’t support what they’re doing to perform a service for them’ is one of the lousier arguments out there for any political argument. Please stop using it. No, of course no one wants to consider sabotage or hap-hazard work because of, in their case, their sexual orientation and that’s likely not going to be the what happens with a business owner. I don’t see a service provider jeopardizing their reputation of quality. Perhaps principle, but not quality of a product. So what is the real protection for those who feel religious liberty protections would only spread hatred and discrimination?

The market. The free market generally cleanses communities of these businesses as citizens see fit. Consider Melissa Klein, the New York baker who refused to make a cake for a gay couple and was subsequently forced to shut down her business over the controversy. The correct way for a business to be put out of business is through reduced patronage, not because the government has regulated it into oblivion and the pending legal costs from a civil suit tank the entire operation. We should pause when the federal standard is more protective of limiting government than that of Georgia (or any state). In Georgia, you can sue someone for not performing a service for you.

And in fixing it, one size doesn’t fit all. Look at the demographics just in our state. In Atlanta, we tend to be a little more tolerant. A business unwilling to serve a gay couple, for instance, would likely face substantial blow-back versus that in rural Georgia where citizens would probably pay for a one-way ticket out-of-town for a couple to be patrons elsewhere. Each community is different and blanket laws won’t solve what some would consider ‘morality issues’. And let’s be realistic: cultures vary. We support that with our “Not in our town!” mentality about everything. Why is this any different? Trying to legislate humans into being what some folks consider ‘good people’ is a recipe for failure. If a business is turning away revenue – there must be a substantial cause for that and who are we to decide if that cause is worthy or not?

While the Hobby Lobby case seems to be dominating the news market, there are many more cases like this popping up all around our state and nation. Our classrooms, our small business owners – they’re all wading through this muddied mess of law versus morality and while we’ve tried to fix it, we’re only making it worse.

So far, here’s where I think we’ve messed up:
Going back to our double-sided ski slope, we have to recognize that this is yet another issue where we are on the chopping block in the media and we likely won’t win. Having said that, we should still be sensitive to the tone and wording. ‘Religious freedom’ means something different to a lot of folks as opposed to ‘religious liberty’. Many see ‘freedom’ as ‘ability’ and ‘liberty’ as ‘protection’. We should acknowledge the distinction.

The conversation may not have started the properly. So much of legislation is first about teaching and educating. When we teach and educate, the conversation travels both ways and we ended up with better legislation. We’ve charged an issue literally clinging to our guns and our religion and it has fogged the entire debate. Hobby Lobby brought out some zealots and the media clung to them. We have to distance ourselves from Hobby Lobby and those zealots. Our argument needs to be crafted two-fold: First, that this isn’t just about Christians, it’s about all religions. We are here to protect the religious liberty of all. And second, this is about the role of government.

We also handed the note to the wrong carrier pigeon. This is where the Christian Right comes into play and can make a difference. My long-time establishment friends will be proud to hear me say this, but it seems like a more moderate person has to carry a bill and be the talking head. I commend those across various states who have put themselves in the line of fire because others are unwilling. It’s noble, but it may not be effective. It’s why Congressman Broun can’t carry the torch. Because this is about religion, but not one specific religion.

So to sum up:

  • Religious liberty at its core is about limited government.
  • The current messengers for religious liberty may not be the right ones at this time.
  • The term ‘religious freedom’ could be damaging to the cause because again, people don’t understand.
  • We’re living in an era where the ‘general public’ might not understand what the end goal is so the first step is conversation, not legislation. You can’t drop a knowledge bomb on someone without first offering a firm definition of what is to be done.

As for the couple looking for vendors, if they want to limit the role of the state for issues like, oh say, marriage, they must understand that government should also be limited elsewhere.

Advertisements

7 thoughts on “Why the Christian Right is Wrong on Religious Liberty

  1. eburkedisciple

    We certainly have a lot to learn about tone and delivery. It is refreshing to see some serious thinking from a younger person. The idea of the dangers of expanding government and stifling regulation seem to be missed by the younger generation that is very sensitive to justice and finding a way to appeal to their intelligence and justice with properly balanced and targeted regulation that will restrain evil without stifling entrepreneurship is the challenge.

    Reply
  2. Pingback: Morning Reads - Thursday, October 2, 2014 - Peach Pundit — Peach Pundit

  3. Huey Mahl

    “We have to distance ourselves from Hobby Lobby and those zealots. ”

    In other words, we need to be more sophisticated in our bigotry than those rednecks at Hobby Lobby.

    Nice.

    Reply
      1. Huey Mahl

        But it gets to the heart of your argument that in the name of freedom, people should be allowed to be bigots. I know you weren’t around for the civil rights movement (neither was I), but your arguments and discussions are just a rehash of the failed arguments of the past. Yes, they are updated for modern times, using current conservative thinking, but you can boil that all down to “My freedom to be a bigot is more important than your freedom to be treated equally in society”

        Religion is a red herring. And the linking of religious liberty to limited government is also a red herring. Whether you believe in an expansive government or a limited one, either way a moral society cannot tolerate bigots, whether it is cloaked in religious observance or natural order arguments of our recent racists past.

        Strip away all the BS, and your article is discussing a way to enable bigots foist their hate-filled philosophy’s upon society.

  4. Chet Martin

    I’m not so sure liberty requires the enabling of bigotry in the marketplace. There is a strong Common Law tradition of requiring any vendor to be open to any member of the marketplace that wishes to purchase from them. Religion was certainly a defense during the Civil Rights Era, as crackpots used ridiculous “Children of Ham” arguments against equal protection (not to mention even more ridiculous arguments about protecting the family.) Just as some/most small government believers have made peace with government action to preserve the free market if a monopoly develops, so should we make peace with government forcing a free market to be available to all consumers.

    Plus, the whole issue is irrelevant to political reality. The 1964 Civil Rights Act will never be repealed (nor should it!) This country will continue its tradition of paying special attention to “protected classes.” If racial minorities, women, and religious minorities will continue to benefit from government protection, there is no reason not to add LGBT Americans to that list. The principle (of doubtful use, in my view) will never be upheld, so let’s go ahead and protect the least of these

    Reply
  5. wchetmartin

    I’m not so sure liberty requires the enabling of bigotry in the marketplace. There is a strong Common Law tradition of requiring any vendor to be open to any member of the marketplace that wishes to purchase from them. Religion was certainly a defense during the Civil Rights Era, as crackpots used ridiculous “Children of Ham” arguments against equal protection (not to mention even more ridiculous arguments about protecting the family.) Just as some/most small government believers have made peace with government action to preserve the free market if a monopoly develops, so should we make peace with government forcing a free market to be available to all consumers.

    Plus, the whole issue is irrelevant to political reality. The 1964 Civil Rights Act will never be repealed (nor should it!) This country will continue its tradition of paying special attention to “protected classes.” If racial minorities, women, and religious minorities will continue to benefit from government protection, there is no reason not to add LGBT Americans to that list. The principle (of doubtful use, in my view) will never be upheld, so let’s go ahead and protect the least of these

    Reply

Have something to say?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s